M27 the Dumbbell Nebula- a Cosmos Mothra (2024)

  • Home
  • Forum
    • Home
    • Latest topics
  • Marketplace
    • Browse Marketplace
    • Post listing
    • Sell
    • Seek
  • Explore
    • Advanced search
    • Equipment
    • Constellations
    • Top pick nominations
    • Top picks
    • Image of the day
    • Groups
    • Remote astrophotography
    • Astrophotographers list
    • Contributors list (beta)
  • Help
    • About
    • FAQ
    • API
    • Sponsors
    • Support
  • English (US)
    • English (US)
    • English (GB)
    • Deutsch
    • Español
    • Français
    • Italiano
    • Português
    • 中文 (简体)
    • العربية
    • Ελληνικά
    • Suomi
    • 日本語
    • Magyar
    • Nederlands
    • Polski
    • Русский
    • Shqipe
    • Türkçe
    • Українська
  • Login
  • Register

Remove ads

Remove ads

  • Home/
  • Image/
  • M27 the Dumbbell Nebula- a Cosmos Mothra

Celestial hemisphere:Northern·Constellation:Vulpecula (Vul)·Contains:Dumbbell Nebula·M 27·NGC 6853

  • View
    • Inverted monochrome
    • Annotated
    • Large size
    • Full size
  • User
    • View profile
    • Send private message
  • Share
    • Navigation context
    • User gallery
    • All image uploads

M27 the Dumbbell Nebula- a Cosmos Mothra (3)

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...

Powered byPixInsight

M27 the Dumbbell Nebula- a Cosmos Mothra

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...

Powered byPixInsight

M27 the Dumbbell Nebula- a Cosmos Mothra

Equipment

M27 the Dumbbell Nebula- a Cosmos Mothra (8)

Description

M27 is a planetary nebula located in the constellation of Vulpecula. With an apparent magnitude of 7.4, it is readily visible with a small binocular, and the oval central body can be clearly distinguished with a small size (5-6") telescope. Under long exposures, M27 with its two wings looks like a big moth, thus I gave it the name Mothra, a moth-llike monster in the Godzilla movie series. M27 is also called by many as apple core or candy. Data acquired by @blackrig, with the well tuned Moana 10"-reflectory. SHO data were used for the nebula while stars were replaced with RGB channels.

Comments

{{else}}

M27 the Dumbbell Nebula- a Cosmos Mothra (10)

{{/if}}

{{#if view.node.isPendingModeration}}

{{#if view.node.userIsContentObjectOwner}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.PendingModerationInfoForContentObjectOwnerView}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.SingleCommentRenderView nodeBinding="this"}} {{else}} {{#if view.node.authorIsRequestingUser}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.PendingModerationInfoForCommentOwnerView}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.SingleCommentRenderView nodeBinding="this"}} {{else}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.PendingModerationInfoForEveryoneElseView}} {{/if}} {{/if}}

{{else}} {{#if view.node.moderationRequested }} {{#if view.node.userIsContentObjectOwner}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.ModerationRequestedButUnneeded}} {{/if}} {{/if}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.SingleCommentRenderView nodeBinding="this"}} {{/if}}

{{#unless view.collapsed}}

{{#if view.node.deleted}}

{{view NestedCommentsApp.I18nView value="deleted"}}

{{else}} {{#if view.editing}} {{view view.EditView commentBinding="view.node"}} {{else}} {{# if view.node.ready}} {{{view.node.getHTML}}} {{else}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.LoaderView}} {{/if}} {{/if}} {{/if}}

{{#if view.node.isPendingModeration}} {{#if view.node.userIsContentObjectOwner}}

{{view NestedCommentsApp.I18nView value="approveVerb"}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.I18nView value="reportAbuse"}}

{{/if}} {{else}}

{{#unless view.node.deleted}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.I18nView value="link"}} {{#unless view.node.authorIsRequestingUser}} {{#if view.userIsAuthenticated}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.I18nView value="reportAbuse"}} {{else}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.I18nView value="reportAbuse"}} {{/if}} {{/unless}} {{/unless}} {{#if view.node.authorIsRequestingUser}} {{#if view.node.deleted}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.I18nView value="undelete"}} {{else}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.I18nView value="delete"}} {{/if}} {{#if view.node.allowEditing}} {{#unless view.editing}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.I18nView value="edit"}} {{/unless}} {{/if}} {{else}} {{#unless view.node.deleted}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.I18nView value="replyVerb"}} {{#unless view.node.liked}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.I18nView value="likeVerb"}} {{else}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.I18nView value="unlikeVerb"}} {{/unless}} {{/unless}} {{/if}}

{{#if view.replying}}

{{view view.ReplyView parentBinding="view.node.comment"}}

{{/if}} {{#if view.node.shouldNotIndent}}

{{else}}

{{/if}} {{#each view.node.children}} {{view NestedCommentsApp.SingleCommentView nodeBinding="this"}} {{/each}}

{{/if}} {{/unless}}

Like

Collaborators

Xinran Li
blackrig

M27 the Dumbbell Nebula- a Cosmos Mothra (13)...

172347

Remove ads

Sky plot

M27 the Dumbbell Nebula- a Cosmos Mothra (14)

Histogram

M27 the Dumbbell Nebula- a Cosmos Mothra (15)

×

Notifications

You have no new notifications.

View allSettings

×

AstroBin is in READ ONLY mode

This page or operation is not available at the moment, because AstroBin is in READ ONLY mode.For more information, please check out our Twitter feed:https://twitter.com/AstroBin_com

M27 the Dumbbell Nebula- a Cosmos Mothra (16)

This feature is only offered at higher membership levels.

Would you be interested in upgrading? AstroBin is a very small business and your support would mean a lot!

Tell me more!

×

Sorry :-(

M27 the Dumbbell Nebula- a Cosmos Mothra (17)

This feature is only offered at the AstroBin Ultimate membership level.

Would you be interested in upgrading? AstroBin is a very small business and your support would mean a lot!

Tell me more!

×

Sorry :-(

M27 the Dumbbell Nebula- a Cosmos Mothra (18)

Only group members can post in a group's forum.

Please join or request to join the group, and then you'll be able to post a new topic.

×

Are you really sure?

If this user has been harassing you, and you shadow-ban them, all their activities on your content will be invisible to everyone except themselves.

They will not know that they have been shadow-banned, and the goal is that eventually they will get bored while having caused no harm, since nobody saw what they posted.

If they follow you, the follow will be removed, and they will not be able to follow you again.

×

Warning!

This operation will reload the current page.If you have any unsaved information in a form, it will be lost.

You can also dismiss this window, and your operation will be applied at the next page navigation.

×

Warning!

This operation cannot be undone!

×

Are you sure?

×

Report abuse

When you report abuse on some content on AstroBin, the content will be hidden until a moderator reviews it. Abuse reports are anonymous and the content's owner will not be notified.

Please specify a reason for this abuse report.

×

Slideshow settings

×

IOTD/TP stats(last [x] days)

Please note:The following tables are updated every 24 hours.

Distribution of astrophotographers

This table shows the number of distinct astrophotographers who have been assigned and IOTD/TP award compared to the total number of images awarded.
Distinct awarded usersTotal awarded images
Image of the day
Top picks
Top pick nominations

Distribution of subject types

This table shows the distribution of awards per subject type, compared to the popularity of images of that subject type.
Image of the dayTop pickTop pick nominationsTotal submitted
Deep sky
Solar system
Extremely wide field
Star trails
Northern lights
Noctilucent clouds
Landscape

Distribution of data sources

This table shows the distribution of awards per data source, compared to the popularity of images acquired from that data source.
Image of the dayTop pickTop pick nominationsTotal submitted
Backyard
Traveller
Own remote observatory
Amateur hosting facility
Public amaeteur data
Professional, scientific grade data
Mix of multiple sources
Other
Unknown

×

Sorry

You cannot like this item. Reason: "ANONYMOUS".

×

Sorry

You cannot remove your like from this item.

×

Delete image and all its revisions?

Please note:You are on a Free account, and when you delete an image, your upload counter does not decrease (unless the image is deleted within 24 hours of uploading it). The Free account is not a way to keep your most recent or best 10 images on AstroBin, but a trial period for you to decide whether or not a paid subscription is worth it. For more information, please click here.

The image will be permanently deleted and cannot be recovered. All its revisions will be deleted too. Are you sure?

×

Delete original image?

The image will be permanently deleted and cannot be recovered. Its revisions will not be deleted. Are you sure?

×

Delete all other versions?

You will delete all other revisions (if any), and the originally uploaded image, leaving the current revision as the final and only version of this image.

×

Delete all revisions?

You will delete all revisions, leaving the originally uploaded image as the final and only version of this image.

×

IOTD/TP stats

The “AstroBin Image of the Day and Top Picks”, or IOTD/TP, is a long-running system to promote beautiful, interesting, peculiar, or otherwise amazing astrophotographs, with a focus on technical excellence.Learn more.

Submitted

The date and time when you submitted this image for IOTD/TP consideration.
...

Views by Submitters (available since September 19th, 2023)

Every image is assigned to 50% of available Submitters. In the event that at least 80% of them don't view the image before its time in the IOTD/TP process expires, it's assigned to the other 50% of Submitters and the process begins anew.

Promotions by Submitters

When 3 distinct Submitters promote the image, it moves on to the next stage of the process: evaluation for Top Pick status. This requirement, in addition to anonymization of images and distribution to only a subset of them, prevents biases and ensures that the best images are selected.

Promotions by Reviewers

When 3 distinct Reviewers promote the image, it moves on to the next stage of the process: evaluation for IOTD status.

Early dismissal

Staff members have a lot of images to inspect on a daily basis, and they can dismiss images if they believe they don't meet the requirements for IOTD/TP selection. If an image is dismissed 5 times, it's removed from the process. This streamlines the process and ensures that any bias present in promotions could be overruled by other staff members.

×

The following people like this image

×

The following people bookmarked this image

×

Warning

This image cannot be submitted for the IOTD/TP consideration.

Reason:

You are not authenticated. Please log in.

×

Flag malfunctioning thumbnails

This will trigger the regeneration of all thumbnails for this image and all its revisions.

×

Contains

Dumbbell Nebula·M 27·NGC 6853

×

Remove yourself as a collaborator

Are you sure you want to be removed as a collaborator to this image?

×

Plate-solving information

StatusBasic success
Started...
Astrometry.net job9928945
PixInsight jobn/a
PixInsight queue sizen/a
PixInsight stagen/a
M27 the Dumbbell Nebula- a Cosmos Mothra (2024)

FAQs

Where is M27 dumbbell nebula? ›

Also known as the Dumbbell Nebula, M27 resides more than 1,200 light-years away in the constellation Vulpecula.

How far away is the Little Dumbbell Nebula? ›

Is the Dumbbell Nebula easy to see? ›

It was the first such nebula to be discovered, by Charles Messier in 1764. At its brightness of visual magnitude 7.5 and diameter of about 8 arcminutes, it is easily visible in binoculars and is a popular observing target in amateur telescopes.

Can you see the Dumbbell Nebula with binoculars? ›

Although the Dumbell is not the only planetary nebula that is visible in 10×50 binoculars, it is significantly easier to see than any other, but will need a larger instrument with more magnification to show some structure. The progenitor star is far too faint to be seen, even in large binoculars.

Who found the Dumbbell Nebula? ›

It was John Herschel, William's son, who, in 1828, gave it the name “dumbbell”, by comparing its shape to the weight that's used in your workout session. But it was French astronomer, Charles Messier, who discovered it on July 12, 1764. In fact, it was the first such planetary nebula ever discovered.

What does the Dumbbell Nebula look like? ›

French astronomer Charles Messier spotted it in 1764. The Hubble images of the Dumbbell show many knots, but their shapes vary. Some look like fingers pointing at the central star, located just off the upper left of the image; others are isolated clouds, with or without tails.

Where is the Ghost Nebula? ›

The Ghost Nebula (designated Sh2-136, VdB 141) is a reflection nebula located in the constellation Cepheus. It lies near the cluster NGC 7023. Looking at the adjacent image, the nebula's name is easily understood. The Ghost Nebula is referred to as a globule (catalogued CB230) and over 2 light-years across.

How big is m27 nebula? ›

What is at the center of the Dumbbell Nebula? ›

The central star in the Dumbbell Nebula is a white dwarf with with a visual magnitude of 13.5 and a radius of 0.055 solar radii, which makes the star the largest white dwarf known. The star has an estimated mass of 0.56 solar masses. It is an extremely hot bluish star with an estimated temperature of 85,000 K.

Does the Dumbbell Nebula have a central star? ›

The nebula is about 1200 light years away and is 2 light years in diameter. The red glow is from ionized hydrogen and the blue-green from ionized oxygen. The remnant central star, visible in the photo, is a white dwarf. It is composed of hot dense matter, but lacks a fusion engine at its core.

Is the Dumbbell Nebula in the Milky Way? ›

Messier 27 (NGC 6853), also known as the Dumbbell Nebula, is a planetary nebula located in the constellation Vulpecula, in the Orion Arm of the Milky Way Galaxy in the Local Group of galaxies. M27 is 1350 light years away from Earth.

How do you spot a Dumbbell Nebula? ›

You'll need to look between the stars Deneb and Altair of the Summer Triangle, above the small constellations of Delphinus and Sagitta. You can use a stargazing app on your smartphone to help identify nearby bright stars to help you “star hop” over to this nebula.

What is M27 in space? ›

The 27th object on Messier's list, now known as M27 or the Dumbbell Nebula, is a planetary nebula, the type of nebula our Sun will produce when nuclear fusion stops in its core. M27 is one of the brightest planetary nebulae on the sky, and can be seen toward the constellation of the Fox (Vulpecula) with binoculars.

How far away is M27? ›

What size telescope do you need to see nebulae? ›

Use scopes of at least 8 inches (200 mm) and focal lengths of less than a 1000 mm for faint, larger nebulae. For fainter, smaller nebulae, scopes of at least 8 inches and focal lengths of 1000 mm or more are recommended. Planetary nebulae: large scopes with long focal lengths are superior.

What was the first nebula ever discovered? ›

The nebula, also known as Messier 27 (M27), was the first planetary nebula ever discovered. French astronomer Charles Messier spotted it in 1764. The Hubble images of the Dumbbell show many knots, but their shapes vary.

What was the first constellation ever discovered? ›

1. Taurus the Bull. Sometimes called the oldest named constellation, Taurus the Bull can be seen in the Northern Hemisphere during the winter and early spring. The red giant star Aldebaran makes up one of the Bull's eyes.

References

Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Barbera Armstrong

Last Updated:

Views: 5668

Rating: 4.9 / 5 (59 voted)

Reviews: 82% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Barbera Armstrong

Birthday: 1992-09-12

Address: Suite 993 99852 Daugherty Causeway, Ritchiehaven, VT 49630

Phone: +5026838435397

Job: National Engineer

Hobby: Listening to music, Board games, Photography, Ice skating, LARPing, Kite flying, Rugby

Introduction: My name is Barbera Armstrong, I am a lovely, delightful, cooperative, funny, enchanting, vivacious, tender person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.